currentsinbiology

23pairsofchromosomes:

Your daily dose of Myoviridae TEM images:

Here’s a nice picture of some Myoviridae phage which infect Salmonella. Generally in the phage world, there are three more common families although others have been found:

  • Siphoviridae with long flexible tails. (P2 above)
  • Myoviridae with long contractile tails (T4 above)
  • Podoviridae with short non-contractile tails. (P22 above)

Phage are first classified based on their morphologies, but bioinformatic information shows the relationships between the families. Typically families of phage are grouped on their appearance as a large amount of the phage genome goes into making the structural proteins.

Myoviridae are quite interesting in the sense that when they bind their host, there are large visible structural changes in the tail region. The tail sheath contracts and the DNA is transported from the head into the bacterium. Other less visible mechanisms are present in the other two morphology types too.

Sam

pistachi0n
biocanvas:

Skin cell division
Cell division is the essential process by which all living things reproduce, but many hurdles must jumped in order for division to be successful. A cell will literally disassemble, replicate, and reorganize nearly all of its structures, partitioning its contents into two newly born daughter cells. In these mouse skin cells, the middle cell has condensed its replicated DNA (in white) and rounded up to facilitate this reorganization. Cells must also decide how they will distribute proteins to each daughter. Here, a protein known as Celsr1 (in red) has been internalized from the cell membrane. Once division is complete, these proteins will be redistributed back to their correct locations within the newly formed cells.
Image captured and submitted by Joel Tamayo, Princeton University.

biocanvas:

Skin cell division

Cell division is the essential process by which all living things reproduce, but many hurdles must jumped in order for division to be successful. A cell will literally disassemble, replicate, and reorganize nearly all of its structures, partitioning its contents into two newly born daughter cells. In these mouse skin cells, the middle cell has condensed its replicated DNA (in white) and rounded up to facilitate this reorganization. Cells must also decide how they will distribute proteins to each daughter. Here, a protein known as Celsr1 (in red) has been internalized from the cell membrane. Once division is complete, these proteins will be redistributed back to their correct locations within the newly formed cells.

Image captured and submitted by Joel Tamayo, Princeton University.

alexatru
alexatru:

teded:



As we grow, we install pain detectors in most areas of our body. These detectors are specialized nerve cells called nociceptors that stretch from your spinal cord to your skin, your muscles, your joints, your teeth and some of your internal organs. Just like all nerve cells, they conduct electrical signals, sending information from wherever they’re located back to your brain. But, unlike other nerve cells, nociceptors only fire if something happens that could cause or is causing damage.


From the TED-Ed Lesson How do pain relievers work? - George Zaidan
Animation by Augenblick Studios

It can be hard for our bodies to localize pain. For instance in heart attacks we can feel the pain in our necks, arms, backs. alexatru

alexatru:

teded:

As we grow, we install pain detectors in most areas of our body. These detectors are specialized nerve cells called nociceptors that stretch from your spinal cord to your skin, your muscles, your joints, your teeth and some of your internal organs. Just like all nerve cells, they conduct electrical signals, sending information from wherever they’re located back to your brain. But, unlike other nerve cells, nociceptors only fire if something happens that could cause or is causing damage.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How do pain relievers work? - George Zaidan

Animation by Augenblick Studios

It can be hard for our bodies to localize pain. For instance in heart attacks we can feel the pain in our necks, arms, backs. alexatru

we-are-star-stuff
teded:



As we grow, we install pain detectors in most areas of our body. These detectors are specialized nerve cells called nociceptors that stretch from your spinal cord to your skin, your muscles, your joints, your teeth and some of your internal organs. Just like all nerve cells, they conduct electrical signals, sending information from wherever they’re located back to your brain. But, unlike other nerve cells, nociceptors only fire if something happens that could cause or is causing damage.


From the TED-Ed Lesson How do pain relievers work? - George Zaidan
Animation by Augenblick Studios

teded:

As we grow, we install pain detectors in most areas of our body. These detectors are specialized nerve cells called nociceptors that stretch from your spinal cord to your skin, your muscles, your joints, your teeth and some of your internal organs. Just like all nerve cells, they conduct electrical signals, sending information from wherever they’re located back to your brain. But, unlike other nerve cells, nociceptors only fire if something happens that could cause or is causing damage.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How do pain relievers work? - George Zaidan

Animation by Augenblick Studios

molecularlifesciences

iadoretheabnormal asked:

Just giving you a topic if you was having a hard time finding one, a new disease is threatening the existence of bananas may be going extinct because of it.

molecularlifesciences answered:

Thank you! 

Actually, this wouldn’t be the first time the banana has been wiped out.  Gros Michel or “Big Mike” was a very widespread variety of banana commonly found at markets, but during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s it was devastated by a blight, Panama disease, and later Sigatoka disease.  To avoid the blight and match the high demand, companies like United Fruit Company bought large plots of land to create plantations.  Paired with corruption in the government, much of the land was bought right out from under the feet of native people who later worked under horrible conditions.  As tensions built between the people and the government, the United States became heavily involved both politically and militarily to maintain the fruit companies hold over Latin America.

If anyone wants a juicy drama about corruption, power struggles, and fungi, just read some Latin American history.

Panama disease is nothing new, but it is a serious threat to monocultures of crops that lack genetic diversity.  People thought our current banana variety, the Cavendish, was immune, but it is not.  Genetic engineering holds some promise, but it is unclear what solution will be best given that we’ve grown accustom to our current fruit. 

Go Bananas! Read more:

Take a guess about what happened to the United Fruit Company. 

Mermaidclone just recommended a novel “Prison Verde.”